The last few years have been great for 3D printing and that goes for the development of different materials to be used with them as well. We’ve seen and tried a lot of new and different experimental materials ourselves and have covered many of them here as well. With filaments designed for 3D printing there are different strengths and weaknesses, so choosing the right one for the job can be a bit of a challenge. Now there is one more useful resource that you can check out regarding different popular materials along with useful and interesting information about each of them thanks to Simplify3D. Their 3D Printing Materials Guide explores all of the popular filaments in use today, providing expert tips to improve your 3D printing results with each material covered. The guide includes in-depth articles for more than a dozen different filament types, along with a detailed Properties Table for comparing the physical and mechanical properties of one material against another.

Along with the Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide, there is also a robust Filament Properties Table that compiles 25 different properties and characteristics for each material. The Table includes detailed metrics such as strength, stiffness, density, and other mechanical properties that could be useful when designing your next part. A built-in comparison tool can be used to select specific materials for side-by-side comparison. Having all of this information in one place greatly simplifies the challenge of selecting the best material for a specific application.

To check out the Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide by Simplify3D…
Here you can find the Filament Properties Table for direct comparison…

Our favorite 3rd parity slicer software for 3D printing Simplify3D just got even better with a ton of new features and improvements to make 3D printing easier and more problem free for a large number of devices. Some of the more interesting new features in Simplify3D version 4.0 include Variable Print Settings, Dynamic Feature Sizing, Improved Model Foundations, Dynamic Gap Fill, Enhanced Preview Controls, Smarter Break-Away Rafts and others. The new version 4.0 also includes many optimizations and bug fixes identified by the user community, so if you are already using the software you should upgrade to the latest version. If you still haven’t used the Simplify3D software you should start by checking if your 3D printer is compatible and if it is, then you should most definitely give it a go… we have been happily using it for years already and just it keeps getting better and more useful.

For more details about the new features and improvements in Simplify3D Version 4.0…

One of the most annoying things that can happen to you is to lose the backplane of a motherboard when you are installing it to a computer case. There are so many variations of backplanes for different motherboards that finding a suitable one is not an easy task. eBay sometimes is your friend, but often there you find overpriced backplanes and when you ad in shipping cost is simply is not worth buying one. The alternative – quickly drawing and then 3D print the backplane you need…

It all started as an experiment with a quick test drawing the insides of a backplane, extruding it to 2mm height and gluing the resulted 3D printed backplane on a frame from an existing backplane. Of course the insides of the non-compatible motherboard backplane needs to be cut first, but that is not a hard thing to do with the right tools and the result does seem to be surprisingly good.

Measuring and replicating the right dimensions with a bit of tweaking of the shapes has produced surprisingly good result for the first test run. So good that I will most likely do some more experimenting with a few more backplanes and why not even do a complete backplane with the frame. Not having to destroy an existing backplane just so that the metal frame can be used saves some time and efforts and if the results are good it won’t be a bad idea to 3D print the whole thing in one piece.

Off to the “drawing board” for the next backplane and then will go for a full once piece solution, though I do have some doubts that the plastic may quickly wear off where it needs to be attached to the computer case. Regardless the backplane is not something that you will need to often remove and reinsert again, so if it manages to hold up to a couple of insert/remove cycles it should still be fine.

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