Posts Tagged ‘3D scanner

shining-3d-einscan-s-desktop-3d-scanner

The EinScan-S 3D scanner is a new affordable consumer oriented desktop 3D scanner from the Chinese company Shining 3D that is supposed to offer high-quality results at a sub $1000 USD price – it should be available for $899 USD. This 3D scanner uses structured light phase shifting technology and should be able to provide accuracy of ≤0.1mm, a resolution that should provide one of the best detail levels for a non-professional, consumer oriented and affordable device. The EinScan-S 3D scanner apparently has two modes, one using the provided automatic turntable for scanning smaller objects with a size of up to 215x215x200 mm and a second fee scan mode using a tripod mount for the scanner with the ability to scan bigger objects up to 700x700x700 mm in size. Shining 3D promises that their device is portable enough for easy carrying around, scanning fast – about 3 minutes for a full automatic turntable scan and easy to be used with automatic processing of the acquired data to provide you with a good 3D model that should be ready to be printed without additional work from the user required.

EinScan-S Desktop 3D Scanner Specifications:
– Single scan range: 215×160 mm
– Max scan volume: Automatic scan 215x215x200 mm, Free scan 700x700x700 mm
– Scan speed: Automatic scan <3min, Free scan <10s (single range) - Alignment method: Automatic align, features align, manual align - Scan mode: Automatic scan, Free scan - Data format: STL, ASC - Resolution: 1.3 Mega pixel - Light source: White light - Printing support: Yes - Scanner dimension: Folded state 400x300x120 mm, Extended state 630x300x280 mm - Scanner weight: 3.5 kg - Power consumption: 50w - AC input: 100V~230V

If you are looking for an affordable consumer oriented product for 3D scanning and then printing the resulting models you might want to keep an eye on the EinScan-S desktop 3D scanner among others. The device is quite interesting in terms of specifications and it it really is able to deliver what the manufacturer promises at this price point it is going to be a great addition to your 3D printer. Again we are talking about an affordable consumer oriented 3D scanner with an expected sub $1000 USD price, not about a professional high-end solution that may cost tens of times or even more that price and would be able to offer better resolution. For its expected price the EinScan-S does look very promising, so we are looking forward to seeing the device available on the market and seeing what it can actually do.

For more information about the Shining 3D EinScan-S Desktop 3D Scanner…

ATLAS 3D is a 3D printable laser scanner kit based on the Raspberry Pi platform that should come as an affordable good quality DIY solution that you can build yourself and get the ability to 3D scan yourself with good quality and at affordable price. The project was published on Kickstarter looking to make it from a prototype to a widely available product with the help of crowdfunding. The goal of the project was just $3000 USD and it has been passed in no time due to the big interests from users that apparently want to have the ability to get an affordable 3D scanner that is able to provide them with good vitality and speed – something that is apparently still lacking in the world of 3D scanners.

ATLAS 3D works by illuminating an object with laser light and then using 3D triangulation to generate a point cloud for each location where the laser hits the model. Neighboring points are then connected as triangles to form a 3D model. This model can be used as-is for many purposes or it can be processed in a software package such as Meshlab to make it water-tight and print ready. All of the software runs onboard the Raspberry Pi, so there are no required drivers or software packages to install. A web browser is used to communicate with the scanner on your home network. Once a scan is performed, the web browser is used to download the resulting models.

atlas-3d-scanner-comparison

The ATLAS 3D scanner should be able to provide better quality than a MakerBot Digitizer at the quarter of the price, though it may still be as good as more than 10 times expensive a NextEngine for example (at least in terms of resolution). This is at least based on the comparison that the author of the ALTAS 3D project has put up on the Kickstarter page. The ATLAS 3D scanner will be available for $209 USD with everything you need apart from the parts you will need to 3D print, so a 3D printer is required for you to get the full product and you will of course need to assemble everything yourself. You might be able to get the 3D scanner a bit earlier if you manage to get among for the early bird supporters on Kickstarter and get your kit as early as April. More units should be available in May and June. Furthermore since this is a free as in open source, open hardware, and open electronic design 3D printable turn table laser scanning platform you will be able to get everything you need from other sources as well and completely build the product yourself.

More details about the ATLAS 3D scanner that you print yourself on Kickstarter…

fuel3d-handheld-full-color-3d-scanner

Recently had the chance to try out one of the most affordable and quite popular full-color 3D scanners, the 3D Systems Sense 3D scanner. We have purchased the Sense 3D scanner to check it out because of its very attractive price compared to almost all alternatives and the fact that the device is handheld and offers the ability to scan larger objects. While the results we got in terms of the 3D mesh detail were pretty good, the texture information was pretty low resolution and not very usable, so we started looking for a better alternative that is not much more expensive. Our search have lead us to discover another handheld full-color 3D scanner – the Fuel3D, a project that has apparently been started on Kickstarter back in 2013 and now they are apparently shipping the device to backers. Fuel3D is also taking orders from new customers with a price of the device set at $1490 USD and with a shipping date set for March 2015.

fuel3d-handheld-full-color-3d-scanner-samples

The technology used in the Fuel3D scanner system is different than what most other 3D scanners use, the Fuel3D relies on two cameras and three flashes to capture the depth and detail information. Judging from the sample scans from the Fuel3D 3D scanner it does manage to provide maybe slightly better detail level on the 3D mesh scan and a significantly better texture information than what we’ve managed to get with our 3D Systems Sense 3D scanner. Do note that the Sense 3D scanner is available for just $399 USD, so it is significantly more affordable as compared to the Fuel3D, even though the level of quality you get is not as good as with the more expensive unit. On the other hand the Fuel3D probably does provide a lower quality when compared to a professional 3D scanner that may cost thousands of dollars. So it all goes down to what you need to do with the 3D scanner and if you only need the 3D surface information or also the texture on top of it, if you can do only with the first and you don’t need too detailed scans then the Sense 3D scanner probably should do. If you also need a more detailed texture information for use along with the 3D geometry of the scanned object than the Fuel3D is probably going to be the better choice. Looking over the specifications of the Fuel3D scanner we should also note that it is apparently not designed to scan larger objects, so you are limited to more like the ability to scan a human head and not a the whole body – something that you should be able to do with the Sense 3D scanner for example. Even though both devices are handheld, it seems that the technology used in the Fuel3D scanner is able to produce better results, but is more limited in the size of the things you can scan and also it might take more time to scan a more complex object. Still the Fuel3D 3D scanner does seem to be an interesting and affordable 3D scanner system in the form of a full-color device that is handheld and is priced so that it can be interesting for the non-professional users.

For more information about the Fuel3D handheld full-color 3D scanner…


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