Posts Tagged ‘flexible filament

The last few years have been great for 3D printing and that goes for the development of different materials to be used with them as well. We’ve seen and tried a lot of new and different experimental materials ourselves and have covered many of them here as well. With filaments designed for 3D printing there are different strengths and weaknesses, so choosing the right one for the job can be a bit of a challenge. Now there is one more useful resource that you can check out regarding different popular materials along with useful and interesting information about each of them thanks to Simplify3D. Their 3D Printing Materials Guide explores all of the popular filaments in use today, providing expert tips to improve your 3D printing results with each material covered. The guide includes in-depth articles for more than a dozen different filament types, along with a detailed Properties Table for comparing the physical and mechanical properties of one material against another.

Along with the Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide, there is also a robust Filament Properties Table that compiles 25 different properties and characteristics for each material. The Table includes detailed metrics such as strength, stiffness, density, and other mechanical properties that could be useful when designing your next part. A built-in comparison tool can be used to select specific materials for side-by-side comparison. Having all of this information in one place greatly simplifies the challenge of selecting the best material for a specific application.

To check out the Ultimate 3D Printing Materials Guide by Simplify3D…
Here you can find the Filament Properties Table for direct comparison…


Fenner Drives, the maker of NinjaFlex a flexible 3D printer filament has announced a new variant of the NinjaFlex family, the SemiFlex 3D printer filament. Like the original NinjaFlex 3D Filament, SemiFlex material boasts flexibility, strength and reliability for your 3D printing projects, and is slightly more rigid to expand your printing possibilities. For the moment the new SemiFlex 3D printer filament is available in just 4 colors: Black, White, Blue and Red with the spool price for the standard more flexible NinjaFlex and the less flexible SemiFlex filaments being the same.

The new SemiFlex 3D filament features a consistent diameter and material properties providing reliable, high quality prints like the original NinjaFlex. It uses a patent pending technology for smooth feeding with a low friction exterior that allows smooth feed through filament guides. The filament provides high elasticity and excellent abrasion resistance, excellent build platform adhesion and bonding between layers and comes with a filament hardness of approximately 98A (50D) for SemiFlex as opposed to 85A for the NinjaFlex. The new SemiFlex 3D filament is available in both 1.75mm filament spool 0.50 kg weight and 3.00mm filament spool with a weight of 0.75 kg.


SemiFlex is best for the following types of projects:
– High level of detail
– Contain intricate parts
– High resolution text
– Unsupported vertical printing
– Shock-absorption needed
– Requires less flexibility than NinjaFlex Original 3D Filament

The SemiFlex 3D Filament Processing Guidelines recommend extruder temperature of between 210-225°C with no heated bed required for printing, though if you have and use one you might want to keep the temperature below 50°C. The recommended Print Speed is 30 mm/s, just like for printing with the original NinjaFlex filament, so prints using this material might require more time than what you would need as compared to when using standard PLA filament for example.


NinjaFlex is the name of a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) filament for 3D printers developed by a company called Fenner Drives. This is not the first flexible 3D printer filament that we are checking out, but it is probably one of the most popular one for this type of filament. The NinjaFlex filament is designed to print on a wide range of 3D printers that use direct-drive extruders with settings similar to the ones you would use for normal prints using ABS or PLA material. There are some differences though that you should be aware of regarding the use of flexible filaments and more specifically NinjaFlex.

This filament does not require you to have a heated build plate, it should stick well to the standard build plate of 3D printers designed only for PLA printing and it should stick well to most surfaces. The manufacturer recommended extruder temperature is between 210-225°C and what you need to make sure to do is to lower the extrusion speed to about 1/3 of the normal one for your 3D printer or to about 30 mm/s in order to have best results. This is similar to other flexible filaments such as the Arnitel Eco Flexible filament that we have already tried. Arnitel is producing flexible filaments with a sightly higher hardness of Shore D between 40 and 70 and the NinjaFlex is rated Shore A hardness of 85, making the NinjaFlex filament slightly more flexible than the Arnitel 40A that we have tried.

The recommended maximum temperature for exposing the NinjaFlex printed parts is 66°C, going higher than that they can start to feel softer not because they are flexible, so the thermal stability is similar to the one that PLA filaments have. The recommended minimum temperature for NinjaFlex printed parts is -30°C, because going below this temperature will make printed parts increasingly brittle and they may even shatter. Also you should note that while occasional contact with water will have no adverse effect on NinjaFlex, the product will degrade and lose its elastic properties when submerged in water for extended periods of time.


The NinjaFlex flexible filament is available in multiple colors including: Black, White, Blue, Red, Silver, Gold, Orange, Green, Semi-transparent, Yellow and Pink in 1.75mm 0.50 kg spools as well as 3mm 0.75kg spools. We got a Green Grass filament spool with diameter of 1.75mm for trying the filament out on our MakerBot Replicator 2 3D printer. Printing with our regular settings for PLA with an extrusion speed of 30 mm/s at three different temperatures has produced varying results. The recommended temperature range by the manufacturer is 210-225°C and we have tested printing at 210, 220 and 230 degrees Celsius with the results as seen on the photo above. At 210 degrees Celsius our test simple house was not not perfect, the base was fine, but the roof had some glitches making the printed part looking ugly, though the filament had no trouble sticking to the build plate. At 220°C visually the result was the best, great looking and smoother finish at 0.2mm layer height at Standard print quality. Going a bit higher and out of the recommended by the manufacturer temperature range still gives us a good print, but the surface finish looks a bit rougher when reflecting light. So it seems that you might want to stick to the upper recommended temperature range when printing with NinjaFlex flexible filament such as 220-225 degrees Celsius for best results.